Sentinel bot source

I’ve been sick the last few days, which hasn’t helped in staying focused so I decided to do a few menial tasks, such as cleaning up my references, and some a little bit more involved but not really that demanding, such as adding documentation to the twitter bot I wrote.

While it’s still a bit messy, I think it’s due time I started putting up some code online, particularly because I love doing it so much. When you code for yourself, however, you don’t have to face the wrath of the computer scientists telling you what you’re doing wrong! It’s actually similar in feeling to editing writing, the more you do it the better you get.

As such, I’ve been using Pycharm lately which has forced me to start using PEP8 styling and I have to say it’s been a blessing. There are so many more reasons than I ever thought for using a very high level IDE and I’ll never go back to hacky notepad++ scripts, love it as I may.

In any case, I hope to have some time someday to add functionality – for example have people tweet coordinates + a date @sentinel_bot and have it respond with a decent image close to the request. This kind of very basic engagement for people who mightn’t be bothered going to Earth Explorer or are dissatisfied with Google Earth’s mosaicing or lack of coverage over a certain time period.

The Sentinel missions offer a great deal of opportunity for scientists in the future, and I’ll be trying my best to think of more ways to engage the community as a result.

Find the source code here, please be gentle, it was for fun 🙂

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A few more from Sentinel bot

I’ve been busy in a lab for the last week or so, so haven’t gotten around to a blog post (Which I’m excited about!) I was planning, though will hopefully be able to get it done tomorrow. For now, here’s a hand picked 10 image gallery from my twitter bot’s feed, for your viewing pleasure! There are some amazing braided rivers in the world!

If anyone is interested in higher resolution images (these are ~20% reduced) please get in touch.

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A slippy map for Sentinel bot

Over the weekend I decided to expand on what was in sentinel bot‘s portfolio by having an automatically updating slippy map, which plots where the point for which sentinel bot has found an image is in the world, as long with the basic metadata of date acquired and lat/lon. I was trying to the leaflet’s marker-clusterer to work but to no avail, couldn’t quite get the knack of it! If anyone has experience with it I’d love to hear from you. I continued with just the pins nonetheless!

One really cool github project I used was this, which allows you to cycle through basemap providers for leaflet and provides you with the javascript code for inserting into your own map. I chose Heidelberg university’s surfer roads for no reason in particular, but may change this in the future. I think I’ll be returning to that github for future slippy maps!

In any case, the product is not perfect, but gives an interesting view of what the bots activities have been for the week it’s been active. I’m not trying to reinvent Earth Explorer, so will probably spend no more time on this, but it was an enjoyable pursuit!

Check the map here.

Sentinel Bot

I’ve been interested in the Sentinel satellite missions, but somehow one can get very distanced from these things unless you’re actively working on them or using their products in some sort of project. As such, I decided I needed a stream of images to keep me interested, and so went about having images pulled down automatically.

On top of this, considering I’m quite fond of Twitter (As the only social media I actively use), I decided to try and have the best of both worlds, so others could share in the Sentinel image goodness.

Having thought about it enough, and having a day free on Saturday, I decided to get to it. I hooked up various parts in an image processing pipeline and sentinel_bot was born. The idea was to have a bot which automatically searches for images which are relatively cloud free, and produce a decent-quality image for direct upload to twitter. It’s having some teething issues (Color balance) but I’m tweaking it slightly to try and make sure the images are at least intelligible.

At the minute it’s tweeting once every 40 minutes or so, but I’ll probably slow that down once it’s gotten a few hundred up.

In celebration, I’ve collated 10 interesting ones so far into an album below (click to enlarge), if you want to check it out it’s at www.twitter.com/sentinel_bot