Sentinel bot source

I’ve been sick the last few days, which hasn’t helped in staying focused so I decided to do a few menial tasks, such as cleaning up my references, and some a little bit more involved but not really that demanding, such as adding documentation to the twitter bot I wrote.

While it’s still a bit messy, I think it’s due time I started putting up some code online, particularly because I love doing it so much. When you code for yourself, however, you don’t have to face the wrath of the computer scientists telling you what you’re doing wrong! It’s actually similar in feeling to editing writing, the more you do it the better you get.

As such, I’ve been using Pycharm lately which has forced me to start using PEP8 styling and I have to say it’s been a blessing. There are so many more reasons than I ever thought for using a very high level IDE and I’ll never go back to hacky notepad++ scripts, love it as I may.

In any case, I hope to have some time someday to add functionality – for example have people tweet coordinates + a date @sentinel_bot and have it respond with a decent image close to the request. This kind of very basic engagement for people who mightn’t be bothered going to Earth Explorer or are dissatisfied with Google Earth’s mosaicing or lack of coverage over a certain time period.

The Sentinel missions offer a great deal of opportunity for scientists in the future, and I’ll be trying my best to think of more ways to engage the community as a result.

Find the source code here, please be gentle, it was for fun 🙂

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EO Detective interviews Tim Peake

I saw this on EODetective‘s twitter account – an interview with Tim Peake about the process behind the astronaut’s photography generated on board the ISS. I’ve actually used a strip of them before to make a photogrammetric model of Italy, and was very curious about the process behind their capture.

Interesting to see they use unmodified Nikon D4s – I was curious about why they were using a relatively small aperture (f/11) for the capture of the images I had downloaded, and while ISO was mentioned I’m still left wondering. I guess they don’t really think about it as they are very busy throughout the day, though he did mention they leave them in fully automatic most of the time. While you could potentially get better quality images from setting a wider aperture, as per DxoMark’s testing on 24 mm lenses, I’m guessing the convenience of using fully-auto settings outweigh the cost.

But that’s not really in the spirit of the interview, which is more to get a general sense of life aboard the ISS.

normed.jpg

A sample image from the ISS